Please note: When buying your tickets - the performance space will be divided in two down the middle (both stage and audience seating). This means odd seat numbers on one side and even seat numbers on the other. The audience changes to their other side at the interval half-way through the performance and thus see both sides.

"CUT" is a dance piece that stems from a particular stage device as well as from the audience’s position. Philippe Saire literally cuts the audience and the stage in two and establishes a very unusual relationship between the audience and the performance. The audience are presented with two distinct sides of the same story. They watch the performance from one side of the stands, then change sides at the interval before watching it again. A new perspective is given to the audience who, by themselves then assemble the various elements of the performance like a puzzle.

The narrative is based on the moment Philippe Saire’s family fled Algeria at the time the country was being liberated. Philippe was five. After an unstable period and a hasty departure, his parents nurtured the memory of a heavenly paradise, where life was gentle and social links were strong, and from which they were banished.

The choreographer builds on his memories of the event to create a fiction that clearly draws away from factual retranscription. However, notions of departure, uprooting, Eldorado and paradise lost are at the heart of the performance.

Hence one of the sides of the stage is characterised by an attempt to maintain relationships and the community, while the other side is treated as a place of latency, of imminent departure, and instability. The two areas of the stage play out a suspenseful narrative, based on partial and contradictory information.
The choreographer likes to experiment with different frameworks, as he has done regularly in his Dispositifs series (Black Out, NEONS, Vacuum) – a series of short pieces inspired by visual arts.

With "CUT", he has created a choreographed work, in which the spatial device reaches its full potential, encompassing both the set and the audience.
More than a simple dance show, "CUT" plays with perception and imagination, inviting the audience to an experiment in the construction of thought.