The performance is presented at Bora Bora as part of an Aerowaves double bill together with the performance "What Does Not Belong To Us". The ticket is valid for both performances (2 performances in 1 night for the price of 1 ticket).

Des Gestes Blancs (White Gestures) - a duet for a father and a son.

A duo of a man and his son tries a physical approach to the notion of the paternal bond, of filitation. Together, they explore the figure of a father and that of a child. All that is left to do is to dance without making any additional fuss. "Des Gestes Blancs" (White Gestures) shows a couple that, through the imbalance and their forces, tries to find precision, discovers the desire to play with each other, coyly takes the chance on tenderness. A dance where the image of one is but a reflection of the other, distorted in time and space.

About the creation:
Lifting is a regular everyday activity shared by parents and their young children. Therefore, the idea was to use tis physical reality as s starting point for encouraging playful relations. How can a duo find a balance when their weight is so different?

Selected this year by Aerowaves - the European network of dance theatres - to be among the Twenty19 - the year's best dance performances from new European talents.

   

Reviews

"In Des gestes blanc, father and 8-year-old son, Sylvain and Charlie Bouillet, joyfully explore a highly physical, adventurous relationship. (...) It is just as much a journey of discovery for the full-grown acrobat as it is for the cheeky child."
- Beatrix Joyce, Springback Magazine (read the whole review)

"It’s not unusual to see a close bond between performers on stage, but rarely does it carry the same intimacy as witnessed between Charlie and Sylvain Bouillet. (...) The result is a piece so natural, so free of artifice, we could be observing the Bouillets in their own living room. (...) As with any familial connection, annoyance creeps in momentarily – until the rip and repair of love we all recognise re-seals the bond."
- Kelly Apter, Springback Magazine (read the whole review)